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A Tradition of Creating Meaningful Rituals

Mon, 10/15/2018 - 12:00am
From JewishBoston


Imbuing a ritual with meaning distinguishes it from routine or habit.


Cindy Kaplan of Newton is raising a daughter with significant special needs. Now 16 years old, Mira has become a driving force behind her family’s Shabbat observance. It’s a celebration infused with ritual that Mira has embraced through her participation at Boston-based Gateways: Access to Jewish Education. As a student in the organization’s Sunday school over the past 10 years, Mira has become a bat mitzvah and thriving member of the Jewish community. Like Mira, all of Gateways’ students are nurtured to become full-fledged participants in Judaism.

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Mayim reflects on her son’s Bar Mitzvah

Mon, 10/08/2018 - 12:00am
By Mayim Bialik from GrokNation 


From her outfit, to the service, to family issues, we have all the details on the festivities


I promised you a report on my FirstBorn son’s Bar Mitzvah which was last weekend, and I will not disappoint. Here it is!

As I wrote last week, my son entered the holy covenant of “adulthood” by becoming a Bar Mitzvah this past Shabbat. And indeed he did! He read the things you read, he chanted the things you chant, he spoke the things you speak, and he completed the ritual.

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Make a wearable mantle (Torah cover)

Mon, 10/01/2018 - 12:00am

 

This recipe is featured in Jvillage Network's Sukkot & Simchat Torah Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here. 
 

From ReformJudaism.org


Using an on old bed pillow cover for each child, cut a hole for the head in the end opposite the opening and two arm holes near the top of each side. Let each child use a variety of materials to decorate their mantle. Wear them to march with the Torahs.


 

7 Fun Things to Do With Kids on Simchat Torah

Mon, 09/24/2018 - 12:00am
 
This article is featured in Jvillage Network's Sukkot & Simchat Torah Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here. 

PJLibrary


Simchat Torah is next week. Start planning.


After the High Holidays, Sukkot, and Shemini Atzeret, it’s time for Simchat Torah, the "Celebration of the Torah." On this special day, Jewish people around the world celebrate the completion of the annual cycle of the Torah reading. Many synagogues even unroll the entire Torah scroll for everyone to look at.

Since Simchat Torah is a joyful holiday, there are lots of wonderful ways to involve kids. Traditionally families dance, decorate flags, and start the next annual cycle of reading. Here are seven ways to mark Simchat Torah with your family:

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Build a Mini (Edible) Sukkah

Mon, 09/17/2018 - 12:00am
 
This article is featured in Jvillage Network's Sukkot & Simchat Torah Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here. 
 

By Brenda Ponnay for ToriAvey.com

 


A sukkah is a temporary hut, or booth, built especially for the week-long Jewish harvest festival of Sukkot. In the Torah, in Leviticus, God commands the Jews to build “booths” and live in them during the festival of Sukkot. This temporary structure is known as a sukkah; it is constructed with three or four walls and a roof known as a “schach” made from natural organic materials. Traditionally, Jewish families decorate the sukkah with a variety of decorations including homemade ornaments, paintings, and streamers.

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Make an Apple Tree Craft Using a Pouf Sponge

Mon, 09/10/2018 - 12:00am
From CraftyMorning.com

This article is featured in Jvillage Network's High Holiday Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here. 


Here’s an easy fall craft for kids to make – an apple tree using a pouf bath sponge as a stamper! It’s always fun to switch up your painting tools and this one is around 50 cents to a dollar at most stores. The one we used is actually a mini one that we got free at the Sheraton hotel but the bigger ones would work as well (love saving money!)

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10 Activities for Meaningful High Holy Days with Kids

Mon, 09/03/2018 - 12:00am
This article is featured in Jvillage Network's High Holiday Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here. 

By Holly Lebowitz Rossi for JewishBoston


The good news is that there are myriad ways to craft, bake, play and learn about the High Holy Days with kids.


The 10 Days of Awe, which include Rosh Hashanah (the Jewish New Year) and Yom Kippur (the Day of Repentance), are perhaps the most meaningful and spiritually intensive days of the Jewish year. But some of the themes of this season, like prayer, forgiveness and justice, can feel abstract to young children. This leaves many parents searching for ways to involve their kids in their observance—ways that involve fun, creativity, meaning and lasting family memories. 

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Learn the Jewish Value: Slicha (Saying Sorry)

Mon, 08/27/2018 - 12:00am
from bimbam.com


Teach your kids about asking forgiveness


Everyone in the Plony house has something to feel a little sorry about – whether it’s breaking something, borrowing something without asking or making wrong accusations.
SHABOOM! Gabi and Rafael talk about SLICHA – or saying sorry. Apologies are more than just words in the Jewish tradition – they are ways of making things right. (Magic totally optional!)

 

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