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The Relevance of Celebrating Tu B’Shevat

Posted on January 14th, 2019

This article is featured in Jvillage Network's Tu B'Shevat Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here. 


By Paula Maccabee for Hadassah Magazine


Many of us dismiss Tu B’Shevat as a tree-planting holiday for children. And for those of us who live in the northern hemisphere, the holiday often falls during the depths of winter, making the “New Year of the Trees” seem misplaced. But Jewish learning and our natural environment require that we reclaim Tu B’Shevat—which this year begins the evening of January 20—as an important holiday to celebrate our relationship with Creation and take responsibility to protect the web of life on Earth.

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6 Israeli Cleantech Companies Putting Sustainability at the Top of Their Agenda

Posted on January 7th, 2019
By Klara Strube, NoCamels


For at least several decades, an overwhelming majority of climate scientists have agreed that global warming trends are occurring at a faster pace and are primarily driven by greenhouse gases emitted by human activities.

But the issue has become highly politicized, especially in the United States, even as new evidence emerges that urgent action is required. Hurricanes, floods, disease outbreaks are all set to worsen over the next decades if international efforts to cut greenhouse gas emissions are not fruitful. At the UN this week, 190 countries agreed to a universal, transparent set of rules on how nations can cut gas emissions but delayed more concrete, impactful decisions.

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Hazon Perspective: Farm Bill Update

Posted on December 31st, 2018
by Hannah Elovitz for Hazon


Our tradition teaches us to open up the corners of our harvest through pe’ah and to attune ourselves to the needs of land for rest and restoration through shmita. We at Hazon are therefore greatly relieved that the recently passed Farm Bill maintains food assistance access for those in need rather than imposing draconian work requirements and that it preserves programs that incentivize farmers to reduce erosion and increase soil carbon.

 

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