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The Great Jewish-Palestinian American Novel

Posted on January 21st, 2019
By Bridget Kevane for Tablet Magazine 


Emerging writer Hannah Lillith Assadi, daughter of a Jewish mother and a Palestinian father, finds a home in the desert of the American Southwest


When writer Thomas McGuane told me about Hannah Lillith Assadi—“I’m presenting an award to a remarkable first novelist, a young woman from Arizona whose mother is Jewish and whose father is Palestinian!”—I was captivated. What, I wondered, was it like being raised by a Jewish mother and a Palestinian father? How did they choose to raise their daughter? What were discussions about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict like at the dinner table? How did their relationship survive the first intifada? The second? Syria? What insight could Assadi contribute to the conflict?

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The Bookshelf: JWA’s 2018-2019 Book List

Posted on January 14th, 2019

 

From the Jewish Women's Archives

 

Are you looking for some thought-provoking or fun reads for you or your book group? 

Check out the many wonderful titles from the Jewish Women's Archives.

The Scroll’s Year in Review

Posted on January 7th, 2019
By The Scroll for Tablet Magazine 


Some 2018 reading you might have missed to catch up on in the year ahead


A few weeks ago we offered a neat, numbered list of the “Tablet Top 10: An entirely subjective list, presented in no particular order, of our 10 favorite articles from Tablet’s Arts & Culture and News & Politics sections in 2018.“

That was the formal affair; ‘entirely subjective’ yes, but, nevertheless, presented with all the prestige and institutional authority of the Tablet imprimatur. Today, in a rather more impulsive and personal manner, The Scroll offers some ad hoc recommendations of its own from outside the Tablet universe. 

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On the Future of the Holocaust Novel

Posted on December 31st, 2018
By Bram Presser for Jewish Book Council
 

In the not-too-distant future, the Holocaust will have passed from living memory. There will be no survivors left to tell us of the horrors they endured, or the triumph of survival, or even the mundane minutiae that is so rarely acknowledged. What they will have left behind is, of course, extraordinary. In volume. In breadth. In depth. Countless words, many of them assembled into great works of literature, others into more modest efforts, written down so that their families might know. Thousands upon thousands of hours of audio and video testimony, pictures, diagrams, photos, ephemera of the most varied kinds. Soon, however, it will all begin to gather dust, to fade into history. It will become a setting, a context, just like every other historical catastrophe.

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